3 Secret To Healthy Teeth and a Great Smile!

Nobody likes to get cavities. Brushing and flossing will help your child avoid the dentist’s drill, but there are other, lesser-known ways to keep your child’s mouth healthy and beautiful.

Secret #1: Eat right—keep your smile bright and your teeth healthy

A healthy diet, rich in whole grains and vegetables and low in processed foods, benefits every part of a child’s body—even the pearly whites. Most of us know that fluoride is important for children’s oral health, but other minerals and vitamins can help reduce gum disease and strengthen teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamins A and D are important for building and protecting tooth enamel; antioxidants (found in many fresh fruits and vegetables) help the body ward off infection, which can lead to gum disease. Since all of these can be found in healthy foods, eating right can be a great tool in your child’s fight against cavities.

Secret #2: Attack the plaque

Starchy or sugary foods mix with the acids in saliva and form a sticky substance called plaque. If the plaque sits on your child’s teeth too long, it can lead to decay (cavities). Brushing, chewing sugarless gum with xylitol or rinsing out your child’s mouth 30 minutes after eating will help remove the plaque, but another idea is to focus on regular meals. Snacking throughout the day means that your child’s mouth is exposed to more bacteria, and, realistically, most children are not going to remember to brush every time they eat. And when they do snack, children should stick to tooth-friendly snacks like cheese or veggies.

Secret #3: Shun the sugary drinks

Speaking of plaque-forming acid, some of the main culprits of tooth decay in children are soda and sugary fruit drinks. These tend to have a high acid content, which erodes tooth enamel—even diet sodas, despite being sugar-free, are highly acidic. When enamel is not strong, teeth are more prone to cavities. Have your child avoid soda and candy as much as possible, and, if children do indulge, make sure they brush their teeth soon afterward.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

Is a Cavity Free Mouth Really Possible?

Wouldn’t it be nice if a magic shield could help protect your children from cavities? Well, think of your dentist as a magician: By using a process called sealants, she or he can help your kids avoid decay in the back molars, the teeth most prone to cavities in young mouths.

The back molars have a few things working against them. They are full of deep grooves, making it easy for food particles and germs to become trapped. They are also difficult to clean, particularly when you’re dealing with small mouths and the impatient little people attached to them. Dental sealants provide a protective coating, made out of a thin plastic substance that covers the grooves on the back teeth. Since food and bacteria can’t get through the plastic, the teeth are protected from decay.

Better still, sealants are virtually invisible, and quick and painless to apply. We clean the tooth using a special gel before painting on the sealant itself. Sometimes, a special light is used to harden the sealant. The process only takes a few minutes to complete, and the sealant can protect the teeth for up to 10 years.

Dentists recommend applying sealants as soon as the permanent molars erupt, before any decay occurs. That way the sealant will be most powerful during the prime cavity-prone years (ages six to 14 years). Sealants can be put on both permanent molars and pre-molars, and are often covered by dental insurance.

Keep in mind, though, that it is still important for children to maintain good oral hygiene. With good brushing, fluoride and regular dental care, sealants can be an almost magical way to keep your children’s mouths healthy and cavity-free!

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

 

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

The Link Between Solid Foods and Cavities in Kid’s Teeth

Dental problems such as cavities (also known as dental caries) can have a major impact on children. Pain and the effect on their appearance may not only leave children feeling bad but can also result in a lifelong fear of dentists. This leaves many parents wondering just how and when to start preventing cavities.

A recent study has shed some light on a factor you may not have considered: how you feed your child. While many parents may think cavity prevention starts only when their child has his or her first tooth, what and how you feed your baby appears to play a crucial role. Certain feeding practices can lead to severe early childhood caries. When that occurs, your child can suffer from

  • pain
  • chewing problems
  • speech difficulties
  • poor self-esteem

On top of that, it can be costly to treat severe early childhood caries. Just as your eating habits affect your likelihood of developing cavities, so too do your child’s feeding practices. Children who are breastfed seven or more times a day after they are 12 months old are thought to have a higher incidence of cavities.

Another risky behavior is using a bottle for liquids other than milk. The number of meals and snacks can similarly put your child at a higher risk for cavities.

When it comes to feeding, what you do today can have consequences later for your child. We have information on how you can help prevent cavities in your child. Simple measures such as avoiding or reducing the consumption of foods high in sugar can help. Appropriate intervals between feedings can also make a difference.

Research shows it is critically important that you receive advice before your child transitions from an exclusive milk diet to solid foods.

 
We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

The Link Between Brushing Your Kids Teeth and Healthy Gums

It is important that you brush your teeth and gums at least twice a day—even better, after every meal, if you can. Brushing removes plaque, a film of bacteria that clings to teeth. When bacteria in plaque come into contact with food, they produce acids. These acids lead to cavities.

Although brushing your teeth seems like a very easy thing everyone can do, you should teach your children the most effective way to brush by modeling your own behavior. Here are ten tips to accomplish this task:

  • Place a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste on the bristles of a soft toothbrush.
  • Place the toothbrush against the teeth at a 45º angle to the gum line.
  • Move the brush across the teeth back and forth gently in short strokes, cleaning one tooth at a time, using a small, circular motion. Keep the tips of the bristles against the gum line. Avoid pressing so hard that the bristles lie flat against the teeth; only the tips of the toothbrush clean the teeth. Let the bristles reach into the spaces between the teeth.
  • Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces and the chewing surfaces of all the teeth. Make sure the bristles get into the grooves and crevices.
  • Use the same small, circular motion to clean the backsides of the upper and lower teeth—the sides that face the tongue.
  • To clean the inner surface of the bottom front teeth, angle the head in an up-and-down position toward the bottom inside of the mouth and move the toothbrush in  several up-and-down strokes.
  • For the inside of the top front teeth, angle the brush in an up-and-down position with the tip of the head pointing toward the roof of the mouth. Move the toothbrush in  several up-and-down strokes.
  • Give your tongue a few gentle brush strokes, brushing from the back forward. Do not scrub. This helps remove bacteria and freshens your breath
  • After brushing your teeth for two to three minutes, rinse your mouth well with water.
  • In addition to brushing, it is important to floss teeth once a day. Flossing gets rid of food and plaque between the teeth, where the toothbrush cannot reach. If plaque stays between teeth, it can harden into tartar, which must be removed with a professional cleaning. Antibacterial mouth rinses (there are fluoride mouth rinses, as well) can also reduce bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease, according to the American Dental Association.

    Taking care of your teeth and gums on a regular daily basis will keep breath fresh and teeth clean, while holding cavity-causing bacteria at bay.

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

Susan

 

Do Kids Need to Floss Their Baby Teeth

How old should your child be before you encourage him to floss? Four, perhaps? After the first permanent teeth begin to erupt? As adolescence begins?

Actually, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends flossing “as soon as there are two adjacent tooth surfaces that cannot be reached by a toothbrush”—or simply put, when two teeth touch—usually during toddlerhood.

Plaque, the film formed by bacteria attaching themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface, knows no lower age limit. At first, the plaque will be soft enough to be removed by a fingernail or toothbrush, but it begins to harden within 48 hours and at 10 days becomes tartar, a hard substance that is difficult to remove at home. Unremoved plaque between teeth raises the risk of inflamedswollen gums andgums that pull away from the teeth (gingivitis). In severe cases, untreated gingivitis can even affect the jawbone.

At age two, though, your child certainly won’t be thinking about the lifelong consequences of not flossing. All she needs to know is that it is something to do once a day, preferably at night, and that Mom or Dad will help until she is old enough to do it on her own.

Rather than use string floss, you may find it easier to manipulate a floss pick in your child’s small mouth. However, use whatever works best for you and your child. Once your child reaches an age when he has the appropriate manual dexterity, probably by age 10 or 11, he can begin to floss his teeth himself.

The teen years are a time when flossing becomes especially important. Teens who don’t eat as well as they should and get too little sleep will find their resistance to infection lowered—including gum infection. Girls, whose hormones make them more susceptible to gum sensitivity and disease anyway, may find that their gums hurt and even bleed in the days before their period begins. While flossing might be uncomfortable at those times, its importance doesn’t diminish.

Taking a few days off from flossing, for whatever reason, only allows the plaque to accumulate and harden, meaning even greater discomfort when flossing resumes. Starting your child on a schedule of regular flossing, even as early as toddlerhood and continuing through adolescence and beyond, can ensure a healthy mouth for a lifetime.

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.We care about your child’s dental health 12 months.

For More Information Contact our Dental Office in Winnipeg -(204)201-0588

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

Even foods that have some nutrition can be detrimental to Children’s Dental Health

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

 

Most of us know that allowing children to snack on sugary foods all day long isn’t the best choice for their overall health. But when it comes to dental health, even foods that have some nutrition can be detrimental. Gummy candies and vitamins, dried fruit snacks and chewy protein bars may seem like smart snacking choices, but they can easily get stuck in between young teeth—and since children typically aren’t the best flossers, this can be a recipe for dental disaster.

Sugar doesn’t actually cause cavities; rather, the sugar acts as “food” for bacteria that cause decay. When carbohydrate-heavy foods become stuck to the teeth, they produce an acid that eats away at the enamel of your child’s pearly whites, allowing bacteria to make a nice, comfy home in the dentin, or center, of the tooth. Once the dentin begins to decay, cavities are the next step down the road to the dentist’s drill and fillings.

Interestingly, eating a massive amount of sugar in one sitting is less harmful than sucking on sugary candies or sipping juice all day long. This is because the more time the mouth spends in that sugary, acidic state, the longer the bacteria can do their dirty, decaying work. After eating a sugary snack, the negative effects can be mitigated if children rinse their mouths with water, brush their teeth or floss.

So while it might be a losing battle to try to remove all sugar and sticky carbohydrates from your children’s diets, you can teach them good dental habits such as

  • chewing sugarless gum with xylitol
  • carrying a toothbrush in their backpack to brush after meals and snacks
  • eating fresh fruit instead of fruit leather or juice
  • choosing chocolate—if you do allow candy—rather than gummy candy (just as it easily melts in your hand, chocolate can easily melt off your child’s back teeth)

And if all else fails, remind your children that swishing some water around in their mouths after snacks is a lot easier than getting a cavity filled!

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

 

 

The Link Between Antibiotics and Cavities

A large-scale 2009 study investigated whether a child’s taking of antibiotics before the age of 2 had anything to do with the development of tooth decay (dental caries) later on. The researchers found a definite association between taking antibiotics at age 0 to 12 months or 13 to 18 months and the later development of early childhood caries.

From such results, one could surmise that the antibiotics themselves are a direct cause of caries that appears months or years after they have been taken.

However, other, possibly more logical, possibilities may exist. Perhaps, if a child is often sick (he is, after all, taking antibiotics), parents may provide extra “treats”—quite possibly sugary treats—to make the child feel “better.” And we are all aware that sugar has been proven to cause tooth decay.

Importantly, children taking antibiotics during the first year of life often take antibiotics in subsequent years. Since such children were presumably deemed ill more often than children who didn’t take antibiotics, they would be more likely to have taken more over-the-counter medications, like cough syrups and acetaminophen. These preparations often contain sugar, contributing to caries just as a sugary snack might.

The infections themselves that the antibiotics were prescribed to treat could also eventually contribute to early childhood caries. In fact, some infections have been linked to developmental enamel defects, a possible springboard to tooth decay.

While more research about the antibiotics–early childhood tooth decay link is needed, we recommend that if your child has taken antibiotics before the age of 18 months, be extra-vigilant about dental visits and oral hygiene in the next few years to help prevent problems and to treat those that do develop as early as possible.

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.We care about your child’s dental health 12 months For More Information Contact our Dental Office in Winnipeg -(204)201-0588

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

Promote Gum Health and Prevent Gingivitis in your Children

When we consider their oral health, we tend to think of our children’s teeth most often. But their gums should be on our minds as well. Gingivitis, or inflammation of the gums, is not uncommon in children, and it can signify more than just a little redness.

Although gingivitis is a condition unto itself, if left untreated it also can lead to more serious periodontal (gum) disease. Gingivitis can run in families, but whether it has affected other relatives or not, you and your child should check regularly for these gingivitis symptoms:

  • Bleeding: Gums may bleed with the gentlest brushing or flossing, or even at other times.
  • Color changes: Gums may be red-purple or bright red, possibly with a shiny appearance.
  • Swelling: A puffy appearance may accompany tenderness.
  • Bad breath: If bad breath (halitosis) does not go away with vigilant flossing and brushing, gingivitis may be the cause.
  • Receding gums: When gums recede, more of the front surface of the teeth than normal is visible, potentially exposing the roots.

If one or more of these symptoms exist, extra-vigilant oral care is the first line of defense to reduce inflammation, starting with a professional cleaning and evaluation. Afterward, even though gums may remain sensitive for one to two weeks, strict adherence to brushing and flossing routines has to begin. Mild anti-inflammatory pain medicine may help during this time. In addition, rinsing with an antibacterial mouthwash or warm salt water may reduce the chance of recurrence. In severe cases, specialized therapies can be used to keep disease from spreading to nearby tissues and tooth-supporting bone.

As boys and girls reach puberty, circulating hormones increase blood flow to the gums, resulting in greater sensitivity. Flossing, for instance, may hurt more, as may food particles or plaque. While the sensitivity is real and understandable, and may last for a while, your child needs to maintain good oral habits.

Helping children to remember that their gums will always be as important as their teeth is a lesson worth its weight in gold—or a lifetime supply of floss.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

 

Got Something Stuck Between Two Teeth – What Now?

Many adults have experienced the irritation of an object trapped between their teeth. Children can suffer the same discomfort too, especially because of the large gaps between their developing teeth.

Young children like using their mouth to explore the world around them; often, the problem starts when a child uses his or her teeth to break apart an object or remove part of a toy. Most frequently, however, it is food that gets stuck between teeth. For some children, the object will be too large, and your efforts to dislodge it will fail. Then, an emergency trip to our office will be necessary.

In most cases, you can remove an object from between your child’s teeth with dental floss or a dental pick.

  • Gently floss your child’s teeth as you normally would.
  • Slide the floss up and down a few times until the object is removed.
  • Rinse your child’s mouth with warm water.
  • Never use a sharp instrument to remove objects.
  • If you child has braces, apply the same techniques.

While you can’t always prevent objects from getting stuck between children’s teeth, you can start by limiting certain foods, such as popcorn, corn on the cob and hard candies. Having your child brush or floss after eating these foods can help. Some parents carry portable, individually wrapped flossing sticks for a quick fix when children get food lodged in their teeth.

If several attempts to remove the object fail, bring your child in to see us. Excessive or repeated force to remove an object could damage teeth and gums. Your child may be complaining of pain, which can be a sign the tooth is damaged. When your child has braces, a dental visit can reassure you that the braces are still fitted properly and the mouth isn’t injured.

If you find that your child frequently gets objects stuck between his or her teeth, the problem may be that the teeth have shifted or cavities are present. Usually, objects stuck between teeth will come out with floss, but when they don’t, we can come to the rescue.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

The Link between Oral Health and Good Grades

Did you know that your children’s oral health can have a significant impact on their school attendance and performance? Studies show that 51 million school-hours are lost in the United States each year due to oral problems. All those absences lead to lower grade point averages for children with poor oral health. Yet even when present in class, these children may be in pain and unable to focus on schoolwork.

Dental problems can interfere with a child’s ability to eat, speak, socialize and sleep, all of which may affect school performance and can have long-term consequences. Fortunately, most childhood dental problems can be prevented with good oral hygiene and regular dental checkups during which problems can be detected and treated before they become serious.

Some parents may think there is no reason to take a child to the dentist unless he or she complains of pain. But by that time, decay and infection could already have caused your child to miss school or perform poorly. In fact, research proves that, unlike absences caused by dental pain or infection, absences for routine dental care are not associated with poorer school performance.

On your own, you can protect your child’s oral health by making sure your child

  • engages in a daily brushing and flossing regimen
  • follows a healthy diet
  • avoids sugary treats and frequent snacking, both of which can lead to tooth decay

Fluoride is one of the best preventive measures against childhood cavities. Most communities supply fluoridated drinking water. Check with our office; if your community does not fluoridate its water, ask us for advice about fluoride toothpaste and other options.

Good oral health goes hand-in-hand with better school performance and better career opportunities in adulthood. Taking an active role in your child’s oral health will enhance your child’s chances of success in school.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Kids Dentist