Caring For Sensitive Teeth

Does drinking a cold soft drink or eating hot soup make your child wince? If so, he or she may be one of the more than 40 million Americans with sensitive teeth.

Tooth sensitivity develops when a tooth loses its protective layers. The part of the tooth above the gum line is protected by a layer of enamel, the hardest substance in the body. A softer layer of a material extends below the gum line and protects the tooth roots. Under this lies a layer of dentin. All these protective layers shield the tooth pulp, which contains nerves and blood vessels. When the enamel and dentin are worn away or a tooth root is exposed, hot, cold or acidic foods—even breathing in cold air—can stimulate nerve cells in the pulp and cause a short, sharp pain.

What can you do to stop this pain? First, take your child to see the dentist if the sensitivity lasts more than a few days. Worn fillings or crowns, cracked teeth, a developing abscess, tooth grinding at night, receding gums or gingivitis—sore, swollen, or inflamed gums—can cause tooth sensitivity. These problems need to be treated.

If your child’s mouth gets a clean bill of health, we may recommend some or all of the following:

  • Choose the right toothpaste. Some people develop sensitivity to tartar-control or whitening toothpastes. Ask your dentist whether an American Dental Association–approved fluoridated desensitizing toothpaste might be right for your child.
  • Brush correctly. Have your child brush gently with a soft-bristled toothbrush. If the bristles on the brush are bent, your child is brushing too hard.
  • Choose the correct mouthwash. Acidic mouthwashes can worsen tooth sensitivity. Ask your dentist to recommend a neutral fluoridated mouthwash for your child.
  • Become more aware of what your child eats. Acidic drinks such as juice and colas can wear away protective enamel.
  • We can apply a fluoride gel, fluoride varnish or dentin sealer to protect the tooth’s roots.

Do not let tooth sensitivity ruin your child’s enjoyment of food. Talk to us about ways to protect your child’s teeth.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

3 Secret To Healthy Teeth and a Great Smile!

Nobody likes to get cavities. Brushing and flossing will help your child avoid the dentist’s drill, but there are other, lesser-known ways to keep your child’s mouth healthy and beautiful.

Secret #1: Eat right—keep your smile bright and your teeth healthy

A healthy diet, rich in whole grains and vegetables and low in processed foods, benefits every part of a child’s body—even the pearly whites. Most of us know that fluoride is important for children’s oral health, but other minerals and vitamins can help reduce gum disease and strengthen teeth. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamins A and D are important for building and protecting tooth enamel; antioxidants (found in many fresh fruits and vegetables) help the body ward off infection, which can lead to gum disease. Since all of these can be found in healthy foods, eating right can be a great tool in your child’s fight against cavities.

Secret #2: Attack the plaque

Starchy or sugary foods mix with the acids in saliva and form a sticky substance called plaque. If the plaque sits on your child’s teeth too long, it can lead to decay (cavities). Brushing, chewing sugarless gum with xylitol or rinsing out your child’s mouth 30 minutes after eating will help remove the plaque, but another idea is to focus on regular meals. Snacking throughout the day means that your child’s mouth is exposed to more bacteria, and, realistically, most children are not going to remember to brush every time they eat. And when they do snack, children should stick to tooth-friendly snacks like cheese or veggies.

Secret #3: Shun the sugary drinks

Speaking of plaque-forming acid, some of the main culprits of tooth decay in children are soda and sugary fruit drinks. These tend to have a high acid content, which erodes tooth enamel—even diet sodas, despite being sugar-free, are highly acidic. When enamel is not strong, teeth are more prone to cavities. Have your child avoid soda and candy as much as possible, and, if children do indulge, make sure they brush their teeth soon afterward.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

The Key To Healthy Tooth Enamel in Children’s Teeth

Tooth enamel, the hardest tissue in the human body, protects teeth from daily wear and tear. If properly cared for, the enamel that covers your child’s teeth is designed to last a lifetime. Although enamel will become worn with normal use, establishing good habits in childhood can go a long way toward keeping the hard covering stable and healthy. Here are a few tips for protecting enamel:

  • Limit sugar-laden foods and drinks. Sugar triggers the production of acid in your child’s mouth. Foods that are both sweet and sticky are especially bad for enamel. Beverages like soda pop frequently contain other ingredients such as citric or phosphoric acid that can be harmful to enamel.
  • Focus on foods that protect enamel. Dairy products help strengthen and protect dental enamel while neutralizing acids in the mouth that can erode enamel over time. If your child likes orange juice, choose a juice with calcium added to help neutralize the juice’s natural acid.
  • Brush thoroughly but gently. Make sure your child uses a soft brush and does not scrub teeth too vigorously. It’s also a good idea to wait about an hour after eating before brushing because some foods can soften enamel, making it more prone to brush-related damage.
  • Look out for chlorine. If your child swims, make sure the gym or pool he or she uses checks and maintains the proper water pH level. Improperly chlorinated pools can become acidic. Tell your child to keep his or her mouth closed when swimming to avoid having his or her teeth come into contact with the water.
  • Drink lots of water. Especially after periods of strenuous play or exercise, drinking water helps keep teeth and gums clean and moist, and reduces levels of harmful bacteria.
  • Avoid the daily grind. Many children grind their teeth at night, a habit that can erode enamel significantly over time. If your child is a grinder, ask us about tooth guards to prevent damage.
  • Visit the dentist regularly. The best way to monitor your child’s tooth enamel for signs of damage is to make sure he or she sees the dentist every six months. Other ways to protect enamel include the use of oral care products containing fluoride.

Start early and monitor your child’s oral health to ensure that the tooth’s enamel will remain intact throughout his or her entire lifetime.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

Is Mouthwash Really Necessary for my Child?

It can be hard enough getting children to brush and floss their teeth; is it really necessary to add mouthwash to the mix? According to the American Dental Association, mouthwash can help prevent gingivitis, combat bacteria in the mouth and, if the mouthwash contains fluoride, reduce cavities. And for children who are not always the most diligent brushers, this extra step can actually do a lot of good. Remember that mouthwash is not a substitute for routine brushing and flossing.

After the age of six, most children can begin to incorporate mouthwash into their oral health routine. Younger children are not adept at the swish-and-spit process and may swallow too much of the fluid. Always instruct children younger than 12 years of age in good rinsing habits. Supervise as necessary to minimize swallowing. You can show your child how to use the mouthwash by using it yourself. When your child uses mouthwash, start by diluting it with water to make it less potent until he or she gets the hang of spitting it all out.

It is important to choose a mouthwash that your child will actually want to use as well as one that is safe for children. Most children’s mouthwashes contain fluoride to give young teeth an extra boost. Some brands have special dyes that show your child the location of bacteria and food in the mouth; they may find this feature intriguing. Child-friendly mouthwashes also contain less alcohol and come in fun flavors like bubble gum or grape. For those who prefer natural options, there are products on the market that use naturally derived ingredients, such as xylitol, baking soda and essential oils.

Mouthwashes marketed to adults can be used, as well, but these are best used by teens. Young children often end up swallowing more mouthwash than they should, and adult mouthwashes may contain higher levels of ingredients that are harmful if ingested in large amounts.

Before using a new mouthwash, always check with us to make sure that it is safe for children—and happy swishing!

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

kids dentist Winnipeg

Gloria

The Link between Oral Health and Good Grades

Did you know that your children’s oral health can have a significant impact on their school attendance and performance? Studies show that 51 million school-hours are lost in the United States each year due to oral problems. All those absences lead to lower grade point averages for children with poor oral health. Yet even when present in class, these children may be in pain and unable to focus on schoolwork.

Dental problems can interfere with a child’s ability to eat, speak, socialize and sleep, all of which may affect school performance and can have long-term consequences. Fortunately, most childhood dental problems can be prevented with good oral hygiene and regular dental checkups during which problems can be detected and treated before they become serious.

Some parents may think there is no reason to take a child to the dentist unless he or she complains of pain. But by that time, decay and infection could already have caused your child to miss school or perform poorly. In fact, research proves that, unlike absences caused by dental pain or infection, absences for routine dental care are not associated with poorer school performance.

On your own, you can protect your child’s oral health by making sure your child

  • engages in a daily brushing and flossing regimen
  • follows a healthy diet
  • avoids sugary treats and frequent snacking, both of which can lead to tooth decay

Fluoride is one of the best preventive measures against childhood cavities. Most communities supply fluoridated drinking water. Check with our office; if your community does not fluoridate its water, ask us for advice about fluoride toothpaste and other options.

Good oral health goes hand-in-hand with better school performance and better career opportunities in adulthood. Taking an active role in your child’s oral health will enhance your child’s chances of success in school.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

 

 

“Magical” Protection from Cavities

“Magical” Protection from Cavities

winnipeg children's dentist- Dr Vodrey - childrens dentist in winnipegWouldn’t it be nice if a magic shield could help protect your children from cavities? Well, think of your dentist as a magician: By using a process called sealants, she or he can help your kids avoid decay in the back molars, the teeth most prone to cavities in young mouths.

The back molars have a few things working against them. They are full of deep grooves, making it easy for food particles and germs to become trapped. They are also difficult to clean, particularly when you’re dealing with small mouths and the impatient little people attached to them. Dental sealants provide a protective coating, made out of a thin plastic substance that covers the grooves on the back teeth. Since food and bacteria can’t get through the plastic, the teeth are protected from decay.

Better still, sealants are virtually invisible, and quick and painless to apply. We clean the tooth using a special gel before painting on the sealant itself. Sometimes, a special light is used to harden the sealant. The process only takes a few minutes to complete, and the sealant can protect the teeth for up to 10 years.

Dentists recommend applying sealants as soon as the permanent molars erupt, before any decay occurs. That way the sealant will be most powerful during the prime cavity-prone years (ages six to 14 years). Sealants can be put on both permanent molars and pre-molars, and are often covered by dental insurance.

Keep in mind, though, that it is still important for children to maintain good oral hygiene. With good brushing, fluoride and regular dental care, sealants can be an almost magical way to keep your children’s mouths healthy and cavity-free!