Even foods that have some nutrition can be detrimental to Children’s Dental Health

Winnipeg Kids Dentist

 

Most of us know that allowing children to snack on sugary foods all day long isn’t the best choice for their overall health. But when it comes to dental health, even foods that have some nutrition can be detrimental. Gummy candies and vitamins, dried fruit snacks and chewy protein bars may seem like smart snacking choices, but they can easily get stuck in between young teeth—and since children typically aren’t the best flossers, this can be a recipe for dental disaster.

Sugar doesn’t actually cause cavities; rather, the sugar acts as “food” for bacteria that cause decay. When carbohydrate-heavy foods become stuck to the teeth, they produce an acid that eats away at the enamel of your child’s pearly whites, allowing bacteria to make a nice, comfy home in the dentin, or center, of the tooth. Once the dentin begins to decay, cavities are the next step down the road to the dentist’s drill and fillings.

Interestingly, eating a massive amount of sugar in one sitting is less harmful than sucking on sugary candies or sipping juice all day long. This is because the more time the mouth spends in that sugary, acidic state, the longer the bacteria can do their dirty, decaying work. After eating a sugary snack, the negative effects can be mitigated if children rinse their mouths with water, brush their teeth or floss.

So while it might be a losing battle to try to remove all sugar and sticky carbohydrates from your children’s diets, you can teach them good dental habits such as

  • chewing sugarless gum with xylitol
  • carrying a toothbrush in their backpack to brush after meals and snacks
  • eating fresh fruit instead of fruit leather or juice
  • choosing chocolate—if you do allow candy—rather than gummy candy (just as it easily melts in your hand, chocolate can easily melt off your child’s back teeth)

And if all else fails, remind your children that swishing some water around in their mouths after snacks is a lot easier than getting a cavity filled!

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

 

 

Are Crowns Necessary on Children’s Teeth?

Most people are surprised to learn that young children can have dental problems that may be treated with crowns—even on baby teeth. A crown is a cover placed over the entire tooth. It is fabricated to look like a tooth and is usually used on teeth that are badly damaged or so decayed that there is not enough tooth structure left to support a large filling.

Although baby teeth eventually fall out and are replaced by permanent teeth, it is important to try to save them until they fall out on their own. Primary teeth enable the child to chew food and develop normal speech patterns, and help to guide emerging permanent teeth into place.

If your child has broken, decayed or severely discolored baby teeth or new permanent teeth, we may recommend treating the problem with a crown. There are several kinds of crown treatments, and we will take into consideration the type and extent of your child’s dental problem, as well as his or her biting patterns, when recommending treatment.

Conventional crowns are usually made of stainless steel, which is very durable. For a more esthetically pleasing result, stainless steel crowns placed on the front teeth may have a white veneer bonded to them. Conventional crowns protect the problem tooth, but their placement requires that the tooth be ground down to accommodate the adhesive needed to attach the crown firmly, resulting in the loss of even more natural tooth structure.

Another treatment option is the composite strip crown, sometimes called acid-etched resin crowns. They involve using a form that is filled with plastic material and placed over the tooth. Strip crowns take longer to place than do stainless steel crowns. In addition, injury to the tooth can break, loosen or dislodge this type of crown. Their durability may depend on how much tooth structure was left in the treated tooth and how prone the child is to cavities. A recent study of 200 children reported a strip crown survival success rate of more than 80% after two years. Strip crowns were found to be a satisfactory and esthetically pleasing treatment.

 

 

We care about your child’s dental health 12 months of the year. To maintain proper oral hygiene, we want to keep you informed and provide useful information. We hope you find these articles informative and helpful, and we look forward to seeing you at your child’s next appointment.

For More Information Contact our Winnipeg Childrens Dental Office. Its just for Kids! -(204)201-0588

 

Winnipeg Childrens Dentist - Dr Vodrey

8 Ways to Getting Kids to Brush Their Teeth | Toddlers & Babies

How to get your child to brush their teeth. Is teeth brushing a chore in your house ? This is a challenge in most peoples homes.

Here is an interesting article that I came across that you may find helpful

http://www.mommyoftwolittlemonkeys.com/2012/01/8-ways-to-getting-kids-to-brush-their-teeth-toddlers-babies/